Mental health support for young people

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Feeling worried about your health or that of your family, or the impact of social isolation is understandable. Here are some organisations that can offer support to young people at this time:

Barnet, Enfield and Haringey Mental Health Trust (BEH CAMHS)

BEH CAMHS have introduced a new helpline for people (including children and adults) experiencing a mental health crisis: 24-hour helpline: 0300 0200 500

You can call this number to get help or advice in a crisis from their trained mental health advisors and clinicians, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

For more details, visit their website.

NHS England advice

NHS England have put together some useful advice if you are worried about a child or young person’s mental health, including:

The NHS has also produced advice for children and young people on what to do and who to ask for help if it’s all getting too much.

Kooth

If you’re aged between 11 and 18, or a child in your care is, Kooth offers free, safe and anonymous online wellbeing and mental health support through mobile, tablet and desktop. Visit their website.

Childline

Young people of all ages can also access support from Childline, which has created a dedicated page with information for children and young people about coronavirus. The page includes information about: what coronavirus is, where children and young people can find help if they are worried, coping if they are staying at home and what to do if they are feeling unwell. Alternatively, young people under 19 can speak to a Childline counsellor online or by calling 0800 1111. The number will not appear on your phone bill. Or visit their website.

NHS Go

NHS Go have a wide range of health topics including managing anxiety. They also provide a confidential health advice and information service for 16-25 year olds.

Exposure and Young Minds also provide mental health support for young people.


Here are some other steps you can take to manage your anxiety:

Be well informed

Use trusted sources for reliable information and be aware that posts on social media may not be accurate. Know what the guidelines are on self-isolation and remember you are taking positive action by staying indoors and washing your hands.

Limit your news and social media intake

Constant new updates may make you feel overwhelmed. Plan to update yourself just once or twice a day. Recognise when social media posts or other people’s anxieties are affecting you, and don’t be afraid to take a break.

Look after your health

Eat and drink well. Remember caffeine, sugar, drugs and alcohol can affect your mood. Exercise each day; you can get outside once a day for a walk, or you can work out at home.

Look after your wellbeing

Maintain a routine and plan your time to help create a sense of routine. Find activities that help you feel calm; singing, drawing, mindfulness. Try to keep busy and find things to distract you if your thoughts are overwhelming. Stay connected with friends through calls and messages.

Deal with difficulties

We may not have as much time or space to ourselves if we are staying at home with our families, and this can cause difficulties. The Children’s Society have good advice which can help you.

Talk to someone about your feelings

Acknowledge your feelings of worry and anxiety and talk about them. Speak to someone your trust about how you are doing each day; a parent, family member, friend, teacher or helpline.


Here are some other organisations where you can find support if you are affected by the death of loved one:

Grief Encounter - support for bereaved children and their families

Don't keep your feelings bottled up inside, share them with trusted adults or friends. Not all pain can be seen, and it’s hard for those around you to understand how you feel. They want to help, so communicate. Grief Encounter team members can add to your list of trusted adults, who can offer you a wealth of support and guidance. Call grieftalk on 0808 802 0111 or drop us an email on grieftalk@griefencounter.org.uk. If you want to meet other bereaved children who will understand exactly what you are going through, we can put you in touch via our fun days and workshops. Don't suffer in silence, and don’t cry alone.

Child Bereavement UK - support for families when a child dies and resources to equip pupils with coping skills for bereavement, now and in later life

Winston’s Wish - support for children and young people after the death of a parent or sibling

CRUSE - support, advice and information to children, young people and adults when someone dies. There’s a section for schools

Samaritans - telephone support, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year

Payprus – support for those affected by suicide


Click here to return to the "Support for families, children and young people" page.

Click here to return to the "Mental health and wellbeing" page.



Feeling worried about your health or that of your family, or the impact of social isolation is understandable. Here are some organisations that can offer support to young people at this time:

Barnet, Enfield and Haringey Mental Health Trust (BEH CAMHS)

BEH CAMHS have introduced a new helpline for people (including children and adults) experiencing a mental health crisis: 24-hour helpline: 0300 0200 500

You can call this number to get help or advice in a crisis from their trained mental health advisors and clinicians, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

For more details, visit their website.

NHS England advice

NHS England have put together some useful advice if you are worried about a child or young person’s mental health, including:

The NHS has also produced advice for children and young people on what to do and who to ask for help if it’s all getting too much.

Kooth

If you’re aged between 11 and 18, or a child in your care is, Kooth offers free, safe and anonymous online wellbeing and mental health support through mobile, tablet and desktop. Visit their website.

Childline

Young people of all ages can also access support from Childline, which has created a dedicated page with information for children and young people about coronavirus. The page includes information about: what coronavirus is, where children and young people can find help if they are worried, coping if they are staying at home and what to do if they are feeling unwell. Alternatively, young people under 19 can speak to a Childline counsellor online or by calling 0800 1111. The number will not appear on your phone bill. Or visit their website.

NHS Go

NHS Go have a wide range of health topics including managing anxiety. They also provide a confidential health advice and information service for 16-25 year olds.

Exposure and Young Minds also provide mental health support for young people.


Here are some other steps you can take to manage your anxiety:

Be well informed

Use trusted sources for reliable information and be aware that posts on social media may not be accurate. Know what the guidelines are on self-isolation and remember you are taking positive action by staying indoors and washing your hands.

Limit your news and social media intake

Constant new updates may make you feel overwhelmed. Plan to update yourself just once or twice a day. Recognise when social media posts or other people’s anxieties are affecting you, and don’t be afraid to take a break.

Look after your health

Eat and drink well. Remember caffeine, sugar, drugs and alcohol can affect your mood. Exercise each day; you can get outside once a day for a walk, or you can work out at home.

Look after your wellbeing

Maintain a routine and plan your time to help create a sense of routine. Find activities that help you feel calm; singing, drawing, mindfulness. Try to keep busy and find things to distract you if your thoughts are overwhelming. Stay connected with friends through calls and messages.

Deal with difficulties

We may not have as much time or space to ourselves if we are staying at home with our families, and this can cause difficulties. The Children’s Society have good advice which can help you.

Talk to someone about your feelings

Acknowledge your feelings of worry and anxiety and talk about them. Speak to someone your trust about how you are doing each day; a parent, family member, friend, teacher or helpline.


Here are some other organisations where you can find support if you are affected by the death of loved one:

Grief Encounter - support for bereaved children and their families

Don't keep your feelings bottled up inside, share them with trusted adults or friends. Not all pain can be seen, and it’s hard for those around you to understand how you feel. They want to help, so communicate. Grief Encounter team members can add to your list of trusted adults, who can offer you a wealth of support and guidance. Call grieftalk on 0808 802 0111 or drop us an email on grieftalk@griefencounter.org.uk. If you want to meet other bereaved children who will understand exactly what you are going through, we can put you in touch via our fun days and workshops. Don't suffer in silence, and don’t cry alone.

Child Bereavement UK - support for families when a child dies and resources to equip pupils with coping skills for bereavement, now and in later life

Winston’s Wish - support for children and young people after the death of a parent or sibling

CRUSE - support, advice and information to children, young people and adults when someone dies. There’s a section for schools

Samaritans - telephone support, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year

Payprus – support for those affected by suicide


Click here to return to the "Support for families, children and young people" page.

Click here to return to the "Mental health and wellbeing" page.



Page last updated: 02 November 2020, 14:16