A1000: Frequently Asked Questions

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Why has the cycle and bus lane been built on the busy A1000?

The A1000 cycle and bus lane scheme has been introduced as part of Barnet Council’s long-term plans to manage the growing number of commuters using Barnet’s roads, as well as the immediate need to make travel safer during the COVID-19 crisis.

The road was identified as an important new cycling route for residents and commuters in Barnet Council’s Long-Term Strategy Plan. Following public consultation in 2020, the plan was agreed and accepted by the council.

The scheme opened in November 2020, with the council’s original timings brought forward by the Government’s Emergency Active Travel Fund to make commuting safer during the COVID-19 crisis.

The A1000 is a wide road which allows the creation of the cycle lane to be introduced along much its length quickly, with little construction work or disruption.

Barnet Council’s long-term planning for traffic management, the money made available by the Emergency Active Travel Fund and ease with which changes to the A1000 can be made meant that the scheme also allowed the creation of sections of new bus lane within the proposed cycle lanes. The cost of building the bus lane has been met by emergency funding from the Department for Transport.


Is the cycle and bus lane a temporary or permanent feature of the A1000?

Barnet Council will decide whether to make the cycle and bus lane scheme a permanent feature after extensive public consultation lasting 18 months. The consultation closes in March 2021.

Initially, Barnet Council introduced the scheme under an ‘Experimental Traffic Order’, which allows for public comments about the measures to be considered after the Order has been implemented.

Experimental Traffic Orders last up to 18 months. In that time comments or objections to the proposals are received and considered.

In advance of the end of the 18-month period, Barnet Council will decide whether to continue the scheme permanently. Any decision will depend on the public feedback received and the road’s position within Barnet’s Long-Term Strategy Plan 2020 – 2041. Options at that point may include to keep it as it is, remove it altogether or keep it with some changes made to address feedback and issues that have arisen, after its launch.


Why was the cycle and bus lane introduced without consulting local residents and road users?

Local residents were consulted on the Long-Term Strategy Plan 2020-2041, which included the cycle lane, in September 2020. The scheme launched in autumn 2020 to address the immediate need to make travel safer during the COVID-19 crisis. Residents and road users have 18-months to provide their views on the A1000 cycle and bus lane.

To take advantage of the Department for Transport’s emergency funding, Barnet Council was committed to building the scheme quickly without prior public consultation.

However, the scheme has been introduced under an ‘Experimental Traffic Order’. These have a maximum duration of 18 months, of which the first 6 months is a statutory consultation period. Comments or objections to the proposals are received and considered. Barnet Council will consider all comments received from the public about this scheme in advance of the end of the 18-month period before making a decision about whether or not to continue the measures permanently, and if so, with or without modification.


Is there an alternative place to build the cycle lane?

The A1000 cycle lane is an important superhighway for many commuters and leisure cyclists, connecting North Finchley Town Centre to East Finchley. The A1000’s width also means it’s the most suitable road for a scheme of this kind in this area.

There are, of course, other roads and links within Barnet that lend themselves to the provision of cycle lanes. All such routes and networks will be considered as part of Barnet’s Long-Term Strategy Plan 2020 – 2041. The Plan identifies the A1000 as a key route for cyclists. The relative ease with which an experimental ‘pop up’ cycle route could be designed and installed along the A1000 - and within government-set time constraints in response to the COVID-19 crisis - marked out the A1000 as the preferred choice.

In addition, the funding was to enable the provision of extra modes of transport for the daily commute during the COVID-19 crisis. The A1000’s status as a major north-south route through the borough again offered it as the best option for the measures.


I’m a local resident, does the cycle and bus lane make the road more dangerous for my family to cross?

The A1000 scheme’s designers have ensured that the cycle lane does not affect the safety of other road users. This process, a standard element of design, will be monitored as part of the consultation process. Any safety concerns that may become apparent will be addressed, as a priority.

The works have required some minor changes to some crossing points along the route. Where footway buildouts have been removed, this has been to ensure that the cycle lane can continue alongside the kerb. At these locations, the buildout would have been installed to ensure waiting pedestrians were visible amongst parked cars; these parking bays would have been removed as part of the design, hence visibility between pedestrians and oncoming traffic has been improved at the original kerb edge.


I drive on the A1000, has the new cycle and bus lane made traffic worse?

Barnet Council is aware of the short-term impact that the introduction of the cycle route has had on drivers and motorcyclists. While the cycle lane scheme provides a safe alternative to public and motorised private transport, the council will ensure that this will not be at the cost of inconveniencing private car users.

After completion in November 2020, the council raised the matter of congestion with Transport for London (TfL). Consequently, TfL reviewed and altered traffic signal timings along the A1000 schemes, to enable the signals to work more efficiently along the route. It may not be possible to resolve all the network congestion issues through signal timings and, therefore, the council is also looking at other design changes to improve the smooth running of the network.

As these initiatives are developed, the council will monitor their impact on traffic flow. Clearly, the current and still fluid conditions associated with lockdowns on top of normal seasonal changes in travel habits, make comparisons more difficult.


What impact is the route having on air pollution along the A1000?

Barnet Council will be monitoring air quality along the A1000 and the data will be used to inform decisions about the design of the cycle lane to improve traffic flow and reduce pollution.

Traffic volume and particularly standing traffic affects air quality. The introduction of the cycle lanes has had an initial impact on how the network copes with current levels of private car volumes. The council is investigating and introducing measures to address standing traffic and will monitor air quality as the scheme develops.


I’m a cyclist, will this cycle lane link to other routes?

Barnet Council’s long-term plan is to create a connected cycle lane network for commuters and leisure cyclists. The experimental A1000 scheme is enabling the council to test ideas and get public and local business feedback on how such a network can benefit all residents, businesses and road users.


Are Barnet’s Council Taxpayers footing the cost of building this cycle and bus lane?

Much of the design and construction costs have been met by the Department for Transport (DfT). The DfT has provided funding to the value of £314,800 as part of its COVID-19 emergency response. This comprised £51,000 direct from DfT and a further £263,800 from DfT via Transport for London (TfL).

In addition, TfL has granted up to a further £208,975 design and construction funding to review and address issues arising from feedback received during the 18-month Experimental Traffic Order consultation.


Will the removal of parking spaces affect the trade of local businesses along the A1000?

Barnet Council is monitoring the effect of the cycle and bus lane scheme on local businesses, especially in terms of trade and deliveries.

Research shows that cycling and public realm improvements can increase local retail sales by up to 30%, and cycle parking delivers five times more retail spend than the same area of car parking.

However, the introduction of the cycle lane, particularly in a short time frame, is a considerable step-change in access and use of the A1000. The council acknowledges that in the short term it has had an impact on how the road works, particularly in terms of access and parking and loading for some residents and businesses.

The council is reviewing feedback and addressing parking loss where it has a serious impact, particularly on business operation. Changes to road layout in areas that affect businesses will be made to mitigate any impact they experience.


What say do I have in the future of this cycle and bus lane?

Local residents, road users and businesses have a statutory period of consultation until 20 March 2021 (6 months from the date of the Experimental Order) to share their views in the A1000 public consultation. Barnet Council encourages everyone to provide their feedback to ensure that long-term traffic planning and management meets the needs of all.

The Experimental Traffic Order itself runs for a maximum of 18 months from September 2020. During this period we will be regularly monitoring feedback and looking to address concerns, where possible.


How can I have my say on the A1000 cycle lane scheme?

Local residents, road users and local business owners are encouraged to share their views on the A1000 scheme.

Please email your views for consideration in the consultation: traffic.consultations@barnet.gov.uk

If you have a question or concern that needs to be addressed, you will receive an answer within two weeks of your email.


Further documentation relating to Barnet’s vision includes:

Why has the cycle and bus lane been built on the busy A1000?

The A1000 cycle and bus lane scheme has been introduced as part of Barnet Council’s long-term plans to manage the growing number of commuters using Barnet’s roads, as well as the immediate need to make travel safer during the COVID-19 crisis.

The road was identified as an important new cycling route for residents and commuters in Barnet Council’s Long-Term Strategy Plan. Following public consultation in 2020, the plan was agreed and accepted by the council.

The scheme opened in November 2020, with the council’s original timings brought forward by the Government’s Emergency Active Travel Fund to make commuting safer during the COVID-19 crisis.

The A1000 is a wide road which allows the creation of the cycle lane to be introduced along much its length quickly, with little construction work or disruption.

Barnet Council’s long-term planning for traffic management, the money made available by the Emergency Active Travel Fund and ease with which changes to the A1000 can be made meant that the scheme also allowed the creation of sections of new bus lane within the proposed cycle lanes. The cost of building the bus lane has been met by emergency funding from the Department for Transport.


Is the cycle and bus lane a temporary or permanent feature of the A1000?

Barnet Council will decide whether to make the cycle and bus lane scheme a permanent feature after extensive public consultation lasting 18 months. The consultation closes in March 2021.

Initially, Barnet Council introduced the scheme under an ‘Experimental Traffic Order’, which allows for public comments about the measures to be considered after the Order has been implemented.

Experimental Traffic Orders last up to 18 months. In that time comments or objections to the proposals are received and considered.

In advance of the end of the 18-month period, Barnet Council will decide whether to continue the scheme permanently. Any decision will depend on the public feedback received and the road’s position within Barnet’s Long-Term Strategy Plan 2020 – 2041. Options at that point may include to keep it as it is, remove it altogether or keep it with some changes made to address feedback and issues that have arisen, after its launch.


Why was the cycle and bus lane introduced without consulting local residents and road users?

Local residents were consulted on the Long-Term Strategy Plan 2020-2041, which included the cycle lane, in September 2020. The scheme launched in autumn 2020 to address the immediate need to make travel safer during the COVID-19 crisis. Residents and road users have 18-months to provide their views on the A1000 cycle and bus lane.

To take advantage of the Department for Transport’s emergency funding, Barnet Council was committed to building the scheme quickly without prior public consultation.

However, the scheme has been introduced under an ‘Experimental Traffic Order’. These have a maximum duration of 18 months, of which the first 6 months is a statutory consultation period. Comments or objections to the proposals are received and considered. Barnet Council will consider all comments received from the public about this scheme in advance of the end of the 18-month period before making a decision about whether or not to continue the measures permanently, and if so, with or without modification.


Is there an alternative place to build the cycle lane?

The A1000 cycle lane is an important superhighway for many commuters and leisure cyclists, connecting North Finchley Town Centre to East Finchley. The A1000’s width also means it’s the most suitable road for a scheme of this kind in this area.

There are, of course, other roads and links within Barnet that lend themselves to the provision of cycle lanes. All such routes and networks will be considered as part of Barnet’s Long-Term Strategy Plan 2020 – 2041. The Plan identifies the A1000 as a key route for cyclists. The relative ease with which an experimental ‘pop up’ cycle route could be designed and installed along the A1000 - and within government-set time constraints in response to the COVID-19 crisis - marked out the A1000 as the preferred choice.

In addition, the funding was to enable the provision of extra modes of transport for the daily commute during the COVID-19 crisis. The A1000’s status as a major north-south route through the borough again offered it as the best option for the measures.


I’m a local resident, does the cycle and bus lane make the road more dangerous for my family to cross?

The A1000 scheme’s designers have ensured that the cycle lane does not affect the safety of other road users. This process, a standard element of design, will be monitored as part of the consultation process. Any safety concerns that may become apparent will be addressed, as a priority.

The works have required some minor changes to some crossing points along the route. Where footway buildouts have been removed, this has been to ensure that the cycle lane can continue alongside the kerb. At these locations, the buildout would have been installed to ensure waiting pedestrians were visible amongst parked cars; these parking bays would have been removed as part of the design, hence visibility between pedestrians and oncoming traffic has been improved at the original kerb edge.


I drive on the A1000, has the new cycle and bus lane made traffic worse?

Barnet Council is aware of the short-term impact that the introduction of the cycle route has had on drivers and motorcyclists. While the cycle lane scheme provides a safe alternative to public and motorised private transport, the council will ensure that this will not be at the cost of inconveniencing private car users.

After completion in November 2020, the council raised the matter of congestion with Transport for London (TfL). Consequently, TfL reviewed and altered traffic signal timings along the A1000 schemes, to enable the signals to work more efficiently along the route. It may not be possible to resolve all the network congestion issues through signal timings and, therefore, the council is also looking at other design changes to improve the smooth running of the network.

As these initiatives are developed, the council will monitor their impact on traffic flow. Clearly, the current and still fluid conditions associated with lockdowns on top of normal seasonal changes in travel habits, make comparisons more difficult.


What impact is the route having on air pollution along the A1000?

Barnet Council will be monitoring air quality along the A1000 and the data will be used to inform decisions about the design of the cycle lane to improve traffic flow and reduce pollution.

Traffic volume and particularly standing traffic affects air quality. The introduction of the cycle lanes has had an initial impact on how the network copes with current levels of private car volumes. The council is investigating and introducing measures to address standing traffic and will monitor air quality as the scheme develops.


I’m a cyclist, will this cycle lane link to other routes?

Barnet Council’s long-term plan is to create a connected cycle lane network for commuters and leisure cyclists. The experimental A1000 scheme is enabling the council to test ideas and get public and local business feedback on how such a network can benefit all residents, businesses and road users.


Are Barnet’s Council Taxpayers footing the cost of building this cycle and bus lane?

Much of the design and construction costs have been met by the Department for Transport (DfT). The DfT has provided funding to the value of £314,800 as part of its COVID-19 emergency response. This comprised £51,000 direct from DfT and a further £263,800 from DfT via Transport for London (TfL).

In addition, TfL has granted up to a further £208,975 design and construction funding to review and address issues arising from feedback received during the 18-month Experimental Traffic Order consultation.


Will the removal of parking spaces affect the trade of local businesses along the A1000?

Barnet Council is monitoring the effect of the cycle and bus lane scheme on local businesses, especially in terms of trade and deliveries.

Research shows that cycling and public realm improvements can increase local retail sales by up to 30%, and cycle parking delivers five times more retail spend than the same area of car parking.

However, the introduction of the cycle lane, particularly in a short time frame, is a considerable step-change in access and use of the A1000. The council acknowledges that in the short term it has had an impact on how the road works, particularly in terms of access and parking and loading for some residents and businesses.

The council is reviewing feedback and addressing parking loss where it has a serious impact, particularly on business operation. Changes to road layout in areas that affect businesses will be made to mitigate any impact they experience.


What say do I have in the future of this cycle and bus lane?

Local residents, road users and businesses have a statutory period of consultation until 20 March 2021 (6 months from the date of the Experimental Order) to share their views in the A1000 public consultation. Barnet Council encourages everyone to provide their feedback to ensure that long-term traffic planning and management meets the needs of all.

The Experimental Traffic Order itself runs for a maximum of 18 months from September 2020. During this period we will be regularly monitoring feedback and looking to address concerns, where possible.


How can I have my say on the A1000 cycle lane scheme?

Local residents, road users and local business owners are encouraged to share their views on the A1000 scheme.

Please email your views for consideration in the consultation: traffic.consultations@barnet.gov.uk

If you have a question or concern that needs to be addressed, you will receive an answer within two weeks of your email.


Further documentation relating to Barnet’s vision includes:

Page published: 12 February 2021, 13:26